Home » Indiana

Indiana



The State of Indiana  was the 19th U.S. state admitted into the union. It is located in the midwestern region of the United States of America. With about 6.3 million residents, it is ranked 15th in population and 17th in population density. Indiana is ranked 38th in land area, and is the smallest contiguous state west of the Appalachian Mountains. Its capital and largest city is Indianapolis.

Residents of Indiana are often called Hoosiers. Although many stories are told, the origin of the term is unknown. The state′s name means "Land of the Indians", or simply "Indian Land". The name dates back to at least 1800, when Indiana Territory was created, at which time the territory was unceded Indian land. Angel Mounds State Historic Site and Mounds State Park are two of the best preserved prehistoric Native American sites in the United States, and can be found near Evansville and Anderson respectively.

History

Indiana was inhabited by migratory tribes of Native Americans possibly as early 8000 BC. These tribes succeeded one another in dominance for several thousand years. By 900 an advanced culture of Mississippians became dominant building large cities of 30,000 inhabitants and massive earthworks in the state. For unknown reasons, their entire civilization disappeared sometime around 1450. The region entered recorded history when the first Europeans came to Indiana and claimed the territory for Kingdom of France during the 1670s. At the conclusion of the French and Indian War and one hundred years of French rule, the region came under the control of the Kingdom of Great Britain. British control was short-lived, as the region was transferred to the newly formed United States at the conclusion of the American Revolutionary War only 20 years later.

At the time the United States took possession of Indiana, there were only two permanent European settlements in the entire territory, Clark′s Grant and Vincennes. The United States immediately set to work to develop Indiana. In 1800, the Indiana Territory was established and steadily settled. It was originally placed under the governorship of William Henry Harrison who oversaw the purchase of millions of acres of land from the native tribes and successfully guided the territory through Tecumseh′s War and the War of 1812.

Indiana was admitted to the Union in 1816 as the nineteenth state. Following statehood, the new government set out on an ambitious plan to transform Indiana from a wilderness frontier into a developed, well populated, and thriving state. The state′s founders initiated a program that led to the construction of roads, canals, railroads, and state funded public schools. The plans nearly bankrupted the state and were a financial disaster, but increased land and produce value more than four-fold. During the 1850s, the state′s population grew to exceed one million and the ambitious program of the state founders was finally realized.

During the American Civil War, Indiana became politically influential and played an important role in the affairs of the nation. As the first western state to mobilize for the war, Indiana′s soldiers were present in almost every engagement during the war. After the Civil War, Indiana remained important nationally as it became a critical swing state in U.S. Presidential elections, which decided control of the federal government for three decades. Following the Civil War, Indiana industry began to grow and an accelerated rate across the northern part of the state leading to the formation of labor unions and suffrage movements.

During the early 20th century, Indiana developed into a strong manufacturing state, then experienced setbacks during the Great Depression of the 1930s. The state also saw many developments with the construction of Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the takeoff of the auto industry in the state, substantial urban growth, and two major United States wars. Economic recovery began during World War II and the state continued to enjoy substantial growth. During the second half the of the 20th century, Indiana became a leader in the pharmaceutical industry, as Eli Lilly and other companies settled in the state.

INDIANA COUNTIES


Madison
Hamilton
Clinton
Hancock
Tipton
Boone
Hendricks
Rush
Putnam
Johnson
Marion
Shelby
Morgan
Fayette
Henry
Porter
Lake
Jasper
La Porte
Newton
Starke
Marshall
Kosciusko
Elkhart
St Joseph
Lagrange
Noble
Huntington
Steuben
Allen
De Kalb
Adams
Wells
Whitley
Howard
Fulton
Miami
Carroll
Grant
Cass
Wabash
Pulaski
Dearborn
Union
Ripley
Franklin
Switzerland
Ohio
Scott
Clark
Harrison
Washington
Crawford
Floyd
Bartholomew
Jackson
Jennings
Jefferson
Decatur
Delaware
Wayne
Jay
Randolph
Blackford
Monroe
Lawrence
Greene
Owen
Orange
Brown
Daviess
Knox
Dubois
Perry
Martin
Spencer
Pike
Warrick
Posey
Vanderburgh
Gibson
Vigo
Parke
Vermillion
Clay
Sullivan
Tippecanoe
Montgomery
Benton
Fountain
White
Warren

Share: