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Kentucky



 

It was once believed that the name Kentucky was derived from the Native American word meaning "dark and bloody hunting ground," which is believed to be due to the fact that many Native American tribes went there to hunt in the game-rich forests and often fought each other there. However, it is now most commonly believed that the name Kentucky can be attributed to various Native American languages with several possible meanings from "land of tomorrow" to "cane and turkey lands" to "meadow lands." This last may come from the Iroquois name for the Shawnee town Eskippathiki. The name Kentucky referred originally to the Kentucky River and from that came the name of the region.

History

Kentucky is one of four states referred to as a commonwealth. Before the American War of Independence, this land was called Transylvania with its capital at Boonesborough. It was a major gateway for early migration to the west through the Cumberland Gap, and was the first major frontier developed west of the Appalachian Mountains. Guns enabled this movement westward, and even the term shotgun was first coined in Kentucky in 1776. After the war, it became Kentucky County, Virginia and ten constitutional conventions took place at the courthouse of Constitution Square in Danville between 1784 and 1792. In 1790, Kentucky delegates accepted Virginia′s terms for separation and the state constitution was drafted at the final convention in April 1792. On June 1, 1792, Kentucky became the fifteenth state in the union and Isaac Shelby, a Revolutionary War hero from Virginia, was named the first Governor of the Commonwealth Of Kentucky.

Kentucky was a border state during the American Civil War and for a time had two state governments, one supporting the Confederacy and one supporting the Union. Fittingly, the Presidents of both the United States (Abraham Lincoln) and the Confederate States (Jefferson Davis) during the Civil War were born in Kentucky.

At the beginning of the war, control of Kentucky was coveted by both sides of the conflict because of its central location. So much so, in fact, that in September 1861, Lincoln wrote in a private letter, “I think to lose Kentucky is nearly the same as to lose the whole game.” The Confederates made advances in the state during the "Kentucky Campaign" of Generals Braxton Bragg and Edmund Kirby Smith in 1862, but Braggs′ retreat following the Battle of Perryville left the state under the control of the Union Army for the rest of the war.

State symbols

  • State bird: Northern Cardinal
  • State flower: Goldenrod
  • State tree: Tulip Poplar (formerly the Kentucky coffeetree)
  • State horse: Thoroughbred
  • State fish: Kentucky Bass
  • State wild animal: Grey Squirrel
  • State butterfly: Viceroy Butterfly
  • State gemstone: Fresh Water Pearl
  • State fossil: Brachiopod
  • State song: "My Old Kentucky Home" by Stephen Foster (1853)
  • State bluegrass song: "Blue Moon of Kentucky" by Bill Monroe (1947)
  • State drink: Milk
  • State motto: "United We Stand, Divided We Fall"
  • State slogan: "Unbridled Spirit"

KENTUCKY COUNTIES


Shelby
Nelson
Trimble
Henry
Marion
Oldham
Jefferson
Washington
Spencer
Bullitt
Meade
Breckinridge
Grayson
Hardin
Mercer
Nicholas
Powell
Rowan
Menifee
Scott
Bath
Estill
Montgomery
Jessamine
Anderson
Woodford
Bourbon
Owen
Madison
Clark
Jackson
Rockcastle
Garrard
Lincoln
Boyle
Fayette
Franklin
Whitley
Laurel
Knox
Harlan
Leslie
Bell
Letcher
Clay
Perry
Campbell
Bracken
Harrison
Boone
Pendleton
Carroll
Grant
Kenton
Mason
Fleming
Gallatin
Robertson
Boyd
Greenup
Lawrence
Carter
Lewis
Elliott
Martin
Johnson
Wolfe
Breathitt
Lee
Owsley
Morgan
Magoffin
Pike
Floyd
Knott
Mccracken
Calloway
Carlisle
Ballard
Marshall
Graves
Livingston
Hickman
Crittenden
Lyon
Fulton
Warren
Allen
Barren
Metcalfe
Monroe
Simpson
Edmonson
Butler
Logan
Todd
Trigg
Christian
Daviess
Ohio
Muhlenberg
Mclean
Hancock
Henderson
Webster
Hopkins
Caldwell
Union
Pulaski
Casey
Clinton
Russell
Mccreary
Wayne
Hart
Adair
Larue
Cumberland
Taylor
Green

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